District of Columbia

In the District of Columbia, there are no bounty hunter-specific regulations.  Pursuant to D.C. Code § 23-1101, the term bondsman means “any person or corporation engaged in the bonding business either as a principal or as an agent, clerk, or representative of another engaged in such business.”

In the District of Columbia, it is the duty of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and the Superior Court of the District of Columbia to provide, under reasonable rules and regulations, the qualifications of persons and corporations applying for authority to engage in the bonding business in criminal cases.  A person cannot act either as principal, or as agent, clerk, or representative of another, engage in the bonding business in either court, until s/he is authorized by order of the court.  The courts, in making these rules and regulations, and in granting authority to persons to engage in the bonding business takes into consideration both the financial responsibility and the moral qualities of the person so applying.  A person convicted of an offense involving moral turpitude or who is not known to be a person of good moral character is not permitted to engage, either as principal or agent, in the bonding business.  The bondsmen must file with the court a list showing the name, age, and residence of each person employed by the bondsman as agent, clerk, or representative in the bonding business[i].

[i] D.C. Code § 23-1108.


Inside District of Columbia